TCMZone Product Overview

TCMzone® is an innovative line of classical Chinese formulas offered in both granular and vegi-capsule form in 5:1 concentration with little to no excipients or binders, allowing each dose to contain the highest percentage of herbal extract.

TCMzone-line

of Herbal Medicine.

· 5:1 Concentration       ·Little/No Excipients or Binders

Quality Manufacture

Our highly concentrated individual packed granules and vegi-capsules are manufactured by Tianjiang Pharmaceutical Co., Ltd. in China, one of the country’s most modern facilities carrying out high level processing techniques in strict accordance with GMP certification. By applying current scientific technology and referring to the traditional making of Chinese herbal decoction TCMzone products are refined by modern industrial ways of extraction, concentration and drying. Tianjiang takes strict control of over the entire process of the raw materials selection, processing, production and packaging, which provides us with the most reliable guarantee for stable quality, efficiency, purity and safety.

Raw herbs: Raw herbs are carefully sourced from selected areas where authentic species of herbs are grown and harvested. Every batch of raw herbs is tested for pesticides and heavy metals. To test for trace amounts of heavy metals state-of-the-art analytic equipment is used such as inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES).

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Manufacturing: Licensed by China’s SFDA with pharmaceutical GMP, Tianjiang has developed their own standard manufacturing procedures on hundreds of herbal formulas. Most importantly, Tianjiang has a full spectrum of manufacturing processes for producing hundreds of granular herbal formulas.

Quality Tests: The quality control tests are performed at specific check points throughout the production process as well as at the finished products. The manufacturer’s in-house modern analytical tests include high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), gas chromatography (GC) and Thin-layer Chromatography (TLC).

Ancient TCM Tradition

Chinese herbs have been used for centuries. Among the earliest literature are lists of prescriptions for specific ailments, exemplified by the manuscript “Recipes for 52 Ailments”, found in the Mawangdui tombs which were sealed in 168 BC. The first traditionally recognized herbalist is Shennong, a mythical god-like figure (or a collective figures of many herbalists), who is said to have lived around 2800 BC. He allegedly tasted hundreds of herbs and imparted his knowledge of medicinal and poisonous plants to farmers. His Shénnóng Běn Cǎo Jīng (Shennong’s Materia Medica) is considered as the oldest book on Chinese herbal medicine. [reveal heading=”%image% Read More→”]The Yellow Emperor’s Inner Canon, the oldest received work of Chinese medical theory, was compiled around the first century BCE on the basis of shorter texts from different medical lineages.  Written in the form of dialogues between the legendary Yellow Emperor and his ministers, it offers explanations on the relation between humans, their environment, and the cosmos, on the contents of the body, on human vitality and pathology, on the symptoms of illness, and on how to make diagnostic and therapeutic decisions in light of all these factors.
The other historical herbalist is Zhang Zhongjing who is believed to live in the end of the Han dynasty, between 196 and 220 CE. His books Shang Han Lun (Treatise on Cold Damage Disorders) and Jing Gui Yao Lue (Essential Prescriptions of the Golden Casket) have become the fundamentals of TCM theory even to today’s practitioners around the world. It was the first medical work to combine Yinyang and the Five Phases with drug therapy. This formulary was also the earliest Chinese medical text to group symptoms into clinically useful “patterns” (zheng) that could serve as targets for therapy.

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Modern Approach

Raw herbs are carefully sourced from selected areas where authentic species of herbs are grown and harvested. Every batch of raw herbs is tested for pesticides and heavy metals. To test for trace amounts of heavy metals state-of-the-art analytic equipment is used such as inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES). Modern analytical tests include high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), gas chromatography (GC) and Thin-layer Chromatography (TLC).